Contributed session - Multi-level governance and biosphere stewardship
C3 (180)
11:00 - 12:30
Chair/s:
Christo Fabricius
Working Together: Building Databases and Collaborative Platforms for the Study of Social-Ecological Systems
John Anderies 1, 2, Ute Brady 1
1 School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, United States
2 School of Sustainabilty, Arizona State University, Tempe, United States
Working together to understand institutional arrangements and governance structures of shared resources requires the careful comparison and analysis of many different case studies from around the world. Information and analysis of these case studies represents shared knowledge infrastructure in its own right. The SES Library at the Center for Behavior, Institutions, and the Environment at ASU (see seslibrary.asu.edu) was developed in order to promote the development of such a knowledge resource by seeking to provide data, analytical tools, a collaborative platform, and a community of practice to the research community. This, in turn, requires that the research community contribute case study data and analysis to the SES Library as well. Currently, the SES Library contains around 200 cases of Social Ecological Systems (SES) in its database. These cases have been analyzed based on the principles of the Institutional Analysis and Development (IAD) and Robustness Frameworks of Ostrom et al. “Case studies” represent the focal point of analysis, i.e. the examination of the complex interactions between communities, the shared resource(s) they govern, and the set of institutional arrangements and social structures within which they are embedded. The SES Library also includes formal mathematical representations that have been developed for various SESs around the world, and data from the original CPR database which was coded by Ostrom, Schlager, and Tang. Additional databases will be added soon. Although the database has been used for comparative case-study analyses and mathematical model development, there remains an unrealized potential for comparative and collaborative research on fundamental organizing principles for governance, e.g. the relevance of the Ostrom's Design Principles, and fundamental feedback structures between different types of infrastructure in SESs. This speed talk will illustrate how the SES Library can be used to advance that potential, and how new community members can contribute to the collaboration.

Presenter/s:
John Anderies
Presentation type:
Contributed session oral presentation
Room:
C3 (180)
Chair/s:
Christo Fabricius
Date:
Wednesday, 23 August
Time:
11:00 - 12:30
Session times:
11:00 - 12:30