Contributed session - Social-ecological transformations for sustainability
Room 32 (30)
11:30 - 13:00
Chair/s:
Cynthia Neudoerffer, Michael Salomons
Resilience Practice, Research and Learning in Complex Developing Environments: The Dynamic Resilience Wheel (DReW)
Angelica V Ospina 1, Garrett Schiche 2
1 Senior Researcher, Resilience Program, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), Ottawa, Canada
2 Director of Program Quality, Lutheran World Relief (LWR), Baltimore, United States
Despite a growing number of resilience initiatives and research, there is still a tangible gap between resilience theory/conceptualization and development practice in the Anthropocene. This gap often translates into a weak or superficial integration of resilience principles in development initiatives, and into a poor understanding of the human-environmental interactions that take place in complex developing environments.

The need for innovative trans-disciplinary approaches for understanding complex systems dynamics is particularly pressing for NGOs working in resilience building initiatives in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Yet, little attention has been paid to creative approaches and methods implemented by development practitioners to address sustainability challenges, to engage local partners in the co-creation of knowledge, and to explore opportunities to achieve resilience outcomes.

This presentation will examine the Dynamic Resilience Wheel (DReW), a novel method and online tool designed for development practitioners to explore, experiment and learn from different combinations of ‘resilience components’ across multiple dynamic layers, in order to strengthen resilience programming. Based on academic research on resilience theory and through participatory methods, the DReW provides practitioners with a new perspective for addressing key resilience questions, deepening the understanding of social-ecological interactions, and strengthening the capacities needed for resilience building in vulnerable contexts (https://lwr.org/what-we-do/resilience/wheel).

A pilot of the DReW was implemented by Lutheran World Relief, an international NGO, in a trans-boundary resilience project in Nepal/India, suggesting that understanding the key components of resilience thinking can help project stakeholders engage more deeply in processes of reflection and learning, while integrating local knowledge in the analysis of resilience data. This involves ensuring a robust understanding of the concept of resilience, of socio-ecological feedbacks and interactions, and of the way in which they translate into development practice.

Further lessons, opportunities and limitations of this approach will be explored from a research and a practitioner’s perspective.

Presenter/s:
Angelica V Ospina
Presentation type:
Contributed session oral presentation
Room:
Room 32 (30)
Chair/s:
Cynthia Neudoerffer, Michael Salomons
Date:
Monday, 21 August
Time:
11:30 - 13:00
Session times:
11:30 - 13:00